06
Jun

US financial outlook worsens immediately after jobs report

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in General

US economic outlook worsens after jobs report
Mounting troubles in Europe and elsewhere have heightened economists' concerns. "The latest economic data have been decisively disappointing," Michael Feroli, an economist at JPMorgan Chase, wrote in a client note. JPMorgan Chase sharply reduced its …
Read more on BusinessWeek

Former WB economist returns to teaching
BEIJING, June 6 (Xinhua) — Justin Yifu Lin, who served a four-year tenure as World Bank chief economist and senior vice president, will soon return to work at Peking University, one of China's top academic institutions, according to the university.
Read more on Xinhua

Mitt Romney presidency would raise the odds of a recession, economist says
June 5 (Bloomberg) — Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz said the election of Mitt Romney as president in November would “significantly” raise the odds of a recession because it would herald a shift to a much tighter budget.
Read more on Washington Post

30
May

The Up coming Chapter for HBCUs: Three Imperatives

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Blog site:&nbsp
Minor Specifics

There has been plenty of speculation about the long term of HBCUs. While some of this has played out in the media, there is also an on-going conversation within this sector about what needs to take place to make sure a viable and productive long term. Both conversations are delicate in nature, saturated with nuance and divergent views concerning which directions are very best. There are, nonetheless, a couple of clear environmental indicators that demand the focus of absolutely everyone concerning the long term of HBCUs regardless of 1&rsquos existing place.

one. Outcomes represent the &ldquocoin of the realm&rdquo: It is challenging to have a conversation about larger education right now without the national degree completion agenda becoming a part of the discussion.&nbsp Federal and state legislators have tuned-in and the accreditation community has upped the ante on the type of proof essential for demonstrating student learning outcomes.&nbsp The point is that institutional effectiveness and import are a lot more closely tied to the percentage of college students who graduate.&nbsp There does not look to be an exemption in the two or 4-year sector for institutions committed to serving poor, underrepresented, initial-generation school college students who face significant hurdles on the way to commencement. Innovation and fine-tuned institutional operations aimed at enhancing student results are no longer negotiable.

two. Delivery systems matter: Enrollment trends have essential financial implications for the viability of most HBCUs. There is now staunch competition for students from all geographic regions and for people with varying academic profiles.&nbsp There is no organic draw and accessibility matters in different approaches nowadays than it has in prior years. Past just getting admitted is the question of whether or not programs and degree programs are delivered in techniques that meet the requirements of nowadays&rsquos college students.&nbsp Two of the top 5 institutions producing the highest quantity of African-American baccalaureates are for-profit institutions. I have to feel that this is a result of non-conventional delivery techniques that make them accessible, thereby attractive to a sizable population of underrepresented students in search of an chance to earn a degree.

three. Utilizing data and evaluation to inform selections: As obvious as this could appear, increased education, as an enterprise, has not done a specifically good occupation at systematically collecting data about student functionality.&nbsp I am occasionally surprised by the truth that the same campus that boasts about its award-winning perform on the human genome is aware of virtually absolutely nothing about the effectiveness of a program intended to enhance persistence amongst STEM majors.&nbsp Traditionally, understanding outcomes have been assumed and the blame for failure has been assigned to college students only. The ability to systemically manufacture sophisticated actionable intelligence about student good results relative to institutional polices and practice is the new gold in greater education.

To be confident, these aspects are in play for all institutions. HBCUs, nonetheless, do not necessarily get pleasure from the luxury of delaying a response to them. And, the simple fact that there is practically nothing to stop them from being on the frontier is fascinating. These environmental elements represent the stage on which the subsequent chapter for HBCUs will play out. The value of HBCUs can not be overstated for the duration of a time when the nation is worried about whether it can create adequate graduates to satisfy workforce demands. Consequently, the up coming chapter will not be about whether these institutions are nevertheless appropriate but how they will make a greater contribution to the nation&rsquos greater education agenda.

Within Larger Ed | Blog U

30
May

Inkling Eventually Brings Its Interactive Textbooks to the Web

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Blog site:
Hack (Increased) Education

The interactive e-book publisher Inkling has eventually released an HTML5 version of its app, meaning that its 150 titles are now obtainable on both the iPad and the Net.

Possibly it&rsquos unfair to say &ldquofinally.&rdquo It has only been 2.5 years considering that the iPad was very first unveiled and because Inkling, founded by the former Apple education exec Matt McInnis, came out of stealth with a textbook app that actually highlighted the potential for re-engineering — not just digitizing — educational sources for these new tablet devices.

Then once again, it&rsquos been two.five years. I&rsquod argue that Inkling&rsquos app and vision remain at the forefront for reimagining textbooks and constructing the technology to support that. But technological innovation moves quite speedily. In people intervening years, the iPad has witnessed rapid adoption, but digital textbooks — specifically ones that aren&rsquot obtainable across gadgets or across platforms (as has been the case with Inkling up &rsquotil now) — genuinely haven&rsquot. McInnis told me in an interview last week that he couldn&rsquot have pitched Sequoia Capital (one particular of its investors) back in 2010 &ldquoto put educational content material on the Net behind a paywall.&rdquo Digital textbooks needed the iPad then to pique men and women&rsquos interest. They needed the Apple App Shop. But now, they require the Net in order to escape the control of that extremely Apple ecosystem. They require the Web to acquire far more widespread adoption.

Inkling also essential some of the advancements that Web technologies, namely HTML5, have created in excess of the past number of years. The Web standard has reached a point of electrical power and stability, and the new Inkling HTML5 Web app can have all the attributes of the really slick iPad app, but with no Flash and no Java and no plug-ins — just HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. McInnis says proudly it could be the &ldquomost sophisticated HTML5 app ever written.&rdquo (It&rsquos worth pointing out here that that sophistication relies on employing an up-to-date webkit-enabled browser — in other words Chrome or Safari.)

By making a feature-rich interactive textbook app that operates across platforms &ndash on the iPad and on the Internet — it might properly be that Inkling has tackled right here 1 of the significant complaints that students have had about digital textbooks: students want to have access to their books across numerous devices. (Other obstacles to student adoption continue to be, like price, of course.)


Inkling has taken care to feel about what the reading knowledge is like based on various gadgets also. What appears in a mobile Net version isn&rsquot just resized, but it&rsquos redesigned from what you see studying that book on your laptop. Certainly, how do we read differently when we&rsquore reading on a mobile device (particularly when we also are &ldquomobile&rdquo) versus at our desks? Do we still prefer to highlight and consider notes into an e-book on a laptop than it is on an iPad? Do we favor to re-study people notes — evaluation, study, cram — on a mobile device? Do we choose to have access to the Web and to other apps (multi-tasking nevertheless sucks on the iPad, right after all)? I&rsquom not confident &ndash it probable depends on the student, I suppose.

Possibly a far better example here is the way in which Inkling&rsquos Frommer&rsquos Guides can perform — after all, how you strategy a trip with a manual when you&rsquore sitting at house is very distinct from how you use a guide when you&rsquore on the road.

Inkling&rsquos not too long ago released Habitat signifies that publishers will be ready to &ldquobuild when&rdquo and layout their content material for all these platforms. That may nicely be a huge draw for publishers.

But once more, we will see if this is a big draw for textbook customers.

Inside Larger Ed | Weblog U

20
May

Plan B and Bob Dylan

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Career Planning

Plan B and Bob Dylan
This dialogue was a reaction to a statement in the fall by the president of American Historical Association about removing the stigma of Plan B from a nonacademic career path. In the report, a assortment of opinions had been voiced about modifying the …
Read far more on Inside Higher Ed

 

The Radical New Humanities Ph.D.
The Stanford document proposes a situation where college students make a decision on a profession strategy — academic or nonacademic — they want to embark on by the end of their second-year of graduate research, file the strategy with their division, and then put together tasks and …
Read a lot more on Inside Greater Ed

 

Science Ph.D. students interest in faculty jobs decreases above time
This study suggests that science Ph.D. students need to have more info and resources about pursuing non-academic careers, the authors create. This research offers distinctive survey proof concerning students occupation preferences, supporting frequent issues …
Study much more on EurekAlert (press release)

 

Sufficient is sufficient. UE grads informed to leave residence, get a task
… deal with at Saturday commencement ceremonies in the Ford Center, but not before stealing some laughter and applause from the family members sections with a bit of nonacademic guidance. Move away from property and get task as soon as achievable, Kazee mentioned.
Study more on Evansville Courier & Press

 

04
May

How economists have misunderstood inequality: An interview with James Galbraith

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic Life

How economists have misunderstood inequality: An interview with James Galbraith
Ahead of 1980, few academics in the United States gave much believed to the thought of economic inequality. It just wasn’t a glaring concern. But in the final 30 years, the incomes of the nation’s wealthiest one percent have surged, and a lot more and more economists …
Read a lot more on Washington Post (blog)

 

What Do Interviewers Discover Initial About You?
By Jada A. Graves Whoever originally mentioned You only get one possibility to make a very first impression&quot was either coming from a work interview or a blind date. The two situations do have certain commonalities. Each can be nerve-wracking social circumstances in …
Study far more on U.S. News & Planet Report

 

Sensible presents can aid out graduate
Their task hunt will also incur some expenditures, such as résumé paper, mailing costs, interview attire and gas for traveling to and from interviews. Present CARDS: If you choose to direct your new graduate’s investing, think about gift cards to restaurants, …
Study more on The Augusta Chronicle

 

30
May

Thoughts on Romney and Higher Ed

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Please read more here: Within Larger Ed | Weblog U
Confessions of a Community School Dean

At least hes not mandating creationism.

Mitt Romneys plans for higher education hence far are silly, but not catastrophic. Currently that puts him ahead of much of his party. .

It was not often hence. There was once a time — not all that lengthy ago, truly — when Republicans took public larger education seriously. The SUNY system never ever had a greater good friend than Nelson Rockefeller, for instance. The University of California program even survived two terms of Governor Ronald Reagan, despite occasional snipes about hippies. .

And that tends to make sense. As conservatives, their burden involved squaring arbitrary economic outcomes with a common cultural sense of the worth of fair play. Education provided a nice way to thread that political needle. The intelligent and driven kid who was born poor could work challenging in a public method and operate his way into the middle class and above. As long as that was correct, individuals on leading could plausibly claim that the total technique is fair, even if they just take place to be a entire great deal wealthier than absolutely everyone else. As extended as the economic hierarchy was at least open to a thing like meritocratic striving, those who have been left out could be blamed for their very own fate.

Over the previous decade or so, though, Republicans — as opposed to conservatives, which they are not any more in any meaningful sense — have shifted their position. Now they&rsquore openly hostile to increased education, except in for-profit kind. Rick Santorum&rsquos “what a snob!&rdquo comment, for all of its artlessness, fairly considerably encapsulated the id of the party in its current form. (The same could be said of Santorum typically.) Some of that is the lingering residue of hippie-bashing, but the latest surge in stridency can&rsquot be explained that way. (I don&rsquot recall a hippie resurgence in 2010.) I consider it goes a tiny deeper than that.

The increased education landscape in its current kind represents a direct disproof of the core of Republican ideology. That&rsquos why they hate it so considerably. It reminds them of the conservatism they left behind.

Please read more here: Within Larger Ed | Weblog U

30
May

My Program Policies

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Please read more here: Inside Higher Ed | Blog U
The Education of Oronte Churm

In a previous posting on “;unteachable students” I included a brief portion of my course policies document from one of my composition classes where I use a Q&A style format to try to give context to the content and practices of the course.

Surprisingly, and to my mind, strangely, there was a fair bit of interest in this, maybe more than the larger message of the posting itself, so I’ve been convinced to include a fuller example of this kind of course policy document.

Some disclaimers:

1.     I make no warrants that this is a good way to do things. Though I do have fourteen years of classroom experience, and often read critical work in literature, composition, and creative writing pedagogy, I am no expert. What I do seems to work for me. Your mileage may vary.

2.     I’m posting this in the interests of discussion, not to demonstrate my non-existent expertise. The development of my own practices and policies is an ongoing and ever-evolving process drawn not just from my experience, but from the knowledge and experience of others. The DNA of previous teachers and colleagues is all over this thing. I’m very interested in hearing from others how they tackle these issues.

3.     I expect that some things I have to say will meet with some disagreement. Again, I would like to hear about different approaches, but the idea of us arguing with each other about who is doing it “;right” and who is doing it “;wrong” is completely uninteresting to me, and probably others.

4.     The other post included material from a composition course. Because I still teach that course, and I don’t want my entire policies searchable on the Internet, I’m using one developed for a literature course that I’m unlikely to teach in the future. My hope is that the principles behind it are the same.

5.     I’ve offered additional comments and annotations here and there in italics, led by my initials, JW.

6.     This document is actually the basis for the first day discussion/activity for the course. At the start of class, I hand out the questions to the students, and they ask them in order. It’s goofy, but sort of fun. I usually speak extemporaneously, rather than reciting the text verbatim from the document, though the content is the same. They print off and read this document after the first class as a reinforcement of the material.

7.     It’s very long, and possibly quite boring. Proceed at your own risk.

English 215: Contemporary Literature

JW: Boilerplate about sections and times and office hours removed for the sake of space. I also haven’t included the specific reading list because I changed it every time.

Frequently Asked Questions about English 215

Q: Who are you?

A: As the top of the syllabus notes my name is John Warner, and I am a native of Northbrook, IL, a northern suburb of Chicago, that is forever immortalized in the great John Hughes movies of the 1980’s (Sixteen Candles, Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, etc…). I graduated from the University of Illinois in 1992 with a degree in Rhetoric, which is really just a fancy name for “;writing.” After a couple of years of work in Chicago, I returned to graduate school at McNeese St. University (go Cowboys) in Lake Charles, LA, where I graduated with two degrees, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing and an M.A. in English Literature in 1997. In addition to teaching I am a writer and have published several books and dozens of articles and stories. I also work as an editor of a daily humor-oriented website called McSweeney’s Internet Tendency (www.mcsweeneys.net).

This is my sixth year at Clemson, and while here I’ve taught writing and literature courses of all shapes and sizes. Prior to coming to Clemson I taught at the University of Illinois and Virginia Tech.

I am an Aries and enjoy long walks in the sand.

JW: As previously noted, I no longer work at Clemson. I include this background information because I want my students to be thinking about me as a specific human being (albeit of a teacher-type), rather than generic “;professor.” I also use it to establish my “;credentials” to teach the course. During discussion of this question during class, I often have fun making them guess what state McNeese St. is in. It usually takes a good 20 tries. The final line about “;long walks in the sand” is a joke, and at the time, I’d never taken a long walk in the sand. I’ve since moved to a place proximate to beaches and do so at least once a week, and it turns out, I really do enjoy them.

Please read more here: Inside Higher Ed | Blog U

29
May

A adjust in occupation (and shirt)

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic Life

A modify in task (and shirt)
Possibly a haircut, some laced footwear, and without having the beer, is a greater choice for a job interview. THERE is a time and location for a flanny (coupled with some entire body odour), but it&#39s definitely not the interview area. Every day employers are astonished by …
Study much more on Warwick Day-to-day News

Report: Charlotte Bobcats to interview Brian Shaw, Quin Snyder for head coach
Shaw was an assistant with Phil Jackson&#39s Lakers for seven seasons and is extensively deemed a preferred to land a head-coaching task sometime quickly. Shaw was a candidate for the Lakers work immediately after Jackson departed last season, but Los Angeles ultimately …
Study far more on SI.com

19
May

Why the Facebook IPO Matters to Ed Tech and Increased Ed

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Website:&nbsp
Technologies and Understanding

Why really should larger ed and ed tech individuals care about the valuation of Facebook? Does it genuinely matter if a bunch of young technologists and investment bankers get fabulously wealthy, and if a group of wealthy, visionary or gullible traders make or drop tons of income?

I believe that the Facebook valuation matters to anyone interested in the educational engineering and publishing sector. I&#39m not specifically certain why I think this, and I&#39m hoping that possibly together we can far better understand the meaning of the Facebook IPO.

Some inquiries about Facebook that I&#39ve been asking myself include:

  • If in two many years Facebook ends up getting really worth significantly less than what individuals are paying for shares these days will we see a chilling impact on investments in the educational technological innovation sector?&nbsp &nbsp
  • Would a a decline in Facebook&#39s valuation contact into question the organization models of other world wide web and mobile primarily based platforms that rely on marketing?
  • Will investors be unwilling to make lengthy phrase bets in education and technology associated organizations given the Facebook IPO and connected bargains (such as Facebook&#39s $ one billion obtain of Instagram?)
  • What will it indicate for smaller sized education and ed tech startups to attract traders and capital?

I see an enormous set possibilities at the intersection between education and technological innovation, possibilities that have practically absolutely nothing to do with the Facebook story.&nbsp The willingness of the investment community to worth Facebook at $ a hundred billion tends to make me critically query how these valuations are derived.&nbsp &nbsp

The lack of vital, in-depth, and questioning analysis of Facebook&#39s company fundamentals is a worrying sign about the capacity of the business and technological innovation press to adequately report on, and analyze, the likely of ed tech startups and much more established for-revenue education organizations.&nbsp

Some excellent factors may come out of the Facebook IPO. I hope that at least some of those young newly minted Facebook millionaires decided to invest in or begin their personal ed tech startups. Better nevertheless, I could think about a situation in which Facebook gets severe about education, and decides to make substantial investments in social mastering.&nbsp

But despite these hopes, I can&#39t shake the feeling that the Facebook valuation is much less about enterprise fundamentals and far more about hype, hope and magical pondering.

Can you help make clear why the Facebook IPO matters, or does not matter, to ed tech and larger ed?

Within Larger Ed | Website U

30
Apr

Class Dismissed

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Blog: 
Confessions of a Community College Dean

Half of new bachelor’s degree grads are either unemployed or underemployed, according to the Associated Press.  

The market isn’t ready to absorb them. Specifically,

According to government projections released last month, only three of the 30 occupations with the largest projected number of job openings by 2020 will require a bachelor's degree or higher to fill the position — teachers, college professors and accountants. Most job openings are in professions such as retail sales, fast food and truck driving, jobs which aren't easily replaced by computers.

I had to smile at “college professors” making the list. When I entered graduate school during the first Bush administration, we were told that a great wave of faculty retirements was on the horizon, and that we’d be in high demand be the time we got out. We all know how that played out. It’s entirely possible that college professor positions will open in great numbers, but only if you fail to differentiate between adjunct and full-time positions. And having adjunct positions available hardly gets around the “underemployment” issue.

At the associate’s level, similar dynamics are playing out. For students who don’t intend to transfer for the four year degree, the market isn’t what it used to be.  (The one partial exception is allied health, such as nursing. And even that isn’t a sure thing.)  Many of the skilled trades took a beating when the construction market collapsed in 2008, and they’re yet to recover.  (We’re pretty sure that’s why so many of the “green jobs” have yet to materialize: they’re based on construction.) Generic “business” degrees don’t do much, and generic liberal arts degrees don’t, either, unless you transfer.

In my darker moments, I sometimes wonder if the root of the problem with public higher education in America is that it was designed to create and support a massive middle class. And we’ve tacitly decided as a society that a massive middle class is not a priority.  We’re trying to fulfill a mission that the country has largely abandoned. When the goal of a prosperous middle class was tacitly dismissed, dominos started to fall.  

The meme making the rounds last week was the announcement that outstanding student loan debt in America reached a trillion dollars.  That’s not a function of community college tuition, obviously, but it indicates that what we’re preparing students for, and what the economy wants them for, don’t align.

Although that’s presented as a failing of colleges, it mostly isn’t. (One could argue about the wisdom of getting a terminal bachelor’s degree in English at Nothing Special Private College, but that’s ultimately marginal.)  It’s mostly a failing of the larger economy, of our politics, and of our priorities. The “starve the beast” strategy has been so effective that it’s easy to forget that as recently as 2000, we were actually paying down the national debt.  Austerity is a choice.

None of which is terribly helpful if you’re twenty-two and graduating with tens of thousands of dollars of debt and no immediate prospects for a job that will make enough to pay both rent and loan payments.  

The new economy is sometimes presented as an issue of intergenerational justice, with the outsize poverty of the young subsidizing the outsize wealth of the old.  That’s true as far as it goes, but it ignores a larger issue. As the boomers retire and X’ers and Y’s fill the workforce, they’ll either have the skills to grow the economy, or not. They won’t develop those skills sitting on the sidelines.  In the absence of growth, prospects for boomers’ retirements are grim, let alone the folks who come after them. According to the most recent report on social security, the system will go broke the year I turn 65.  Thanks, guys.  If we want to get things moving, we need to integrate the young into the productive workforce ASAP.

College still passes the “I’d send my kid” test. I fully intend to send mine. As insurance policies go, it’s weaker than it once was, but it still beats most of the alternatives. I just hope that as a society, we don’t make the mistake of blaming colleges for preparing students for jobs that aren’t there, when we made the choice to let those jobs dry up.

Inside Higher Ed | Blog U