Posts Tagged ‘into’

05
Sep

CA Gov. Jerry Brown Signs Into Law Landmark Protections For Transgender

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Career Planning

CA Gov. Jerry Brown Signs Into Law Landmark Protections For Transgender
(a) It is the policy of the state that elementary and secondary school classes and courses, including nonacademic and elective classes and courses, be conducted, without regard to the sex of the pupil enrolled in these classes and courses. (b) A school …
Read more on Towleroad

Enhancing employability
Securing a good job is top of the agenda for majority of Indian students returning home after studying overseas. Competition is fierce, so it is important to equip yourself with the relevant skills, says ELLEN O'BRIEN, international careers adviser …
Read more on Times of India

03
Aug

Frederick guy &#39blessed&#39 to flip troubled previous into greater path

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic Life

Frederick man 'blessed' to turn troubled past into better path
His history of alcohol abuse and frequent run-ins with the law for assaults, drugs and DWIs kept him from graduating from Frederick High School and holding a steady job. … I just can't believe how far I went," he said Thursday during an emotional …
Read more on Frederick News Post (subscription)

Job Interviews At Resident' Evil's Umbrella Corporation Would Be Weird
Oh, it's not called Umberella but anyone who's been around video games for the last 20 17 years knows where this job interview is happening. Sparsely scattered bullets? Illegal genetic experiments? Parasol, indeed. If you've played Resident Evil — or …
Read more on Kotaku Australia

In the kitchen with… Marco Pierre White
But I also remember going for a job interview in 1984 with Raymond Blanc and every mouthful of that lunch has stayed with me – it included pigeon and ended with an amazing apple souffle. Oh, and I got the job. What's your top tip for amateur chefs?
Read more on The Sun

24
Jan

Prophetic Debate Takes Us Into 2013

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in General

Prophetic Debate Takes Us Into 2013
Prophet Uebert holds a PhD in Theology, but says that theology does not educate spirituality, and properly-respected American preacher, Kenneth Hagin, mentors him. He also says that he is not a prosperity preacher, but a preacher who is prospering. Based in …
Go through more on AllAfrica.com

Forced Choices Can Lead to Unethical Selection-Creating
“One of the most strong equipment to combat high-threat or unethical selection-creating may possibly merely be providing managers the alternative not to decide on,” explained lead researcher Theodore Noseworthy, Ph.D. The investigation also underscores how psychological mechanisms …
Read more on PsychCentral.com

05
Nov

Did MOOCs Just Make Landfall? ten Questions to Take into account

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Inside Higher Ed | Blog U

Blog: 
StratEDgy

It seems we may have another big, unpredictable storm close to home -; MOOCs.   They have been getting a lot of press this year, and here's another recent article from the New York Times – "The Year of the MOOC."

Last week Inside Higher Ed announced a partnership between Coursera and Antioch University to license Coursera courses for Antioch degree programs. 

In short, here’s the business model:  Universities such as Duke and the University of Pennsylvania work with Coursera to produce massively open online courses (“MOOCs”) that are offered for free (at least until this point) through Coursera.  Some schools, like Antioch, may decide to license these courses and will pay Coursera a fee to do so.  Coursera will share the gross revenue and net profit from these licensed courses with the universities that produced the content.  The faculty that produced the course will also receive some revenue.  Schools like Antioch will offer these licensed MOOCs to their students, thus giving them access to a wider array of courses and instructors, including “;rock star” faculty from well-known universities.  Because the cost of licensing the content through Coursera will likely be smaller than the cost of hiring these well-known faculty to teach at the licensee school, universities like Antioch that work through Coursera can pass the savings on to students, thus lowering the cost of a degree. 

From the Antioch University website: “;Each Coursera course will be facilitated by an AULA faculty member who will also be enrolled in the course, thereby enabling both frequent interaction between students and instructor and augmentation of the course through supplemental exercises and projects focused on expanding the learning experience.”

Like a storm, the higher education landscape is in a swirl and small pivots may produce large, important changes.  We wonder whether this might be an early pivot . . . and potentially change who is in the path of the storm and who is considered safe -; for now, until the next pivot.  We’ve written about the dismantling of higher education,  potential business models for edX and content creators and distributors, how at least one student perceived his experience in the first MITx MOOC, and the multitude of factors impacting the higher education market right now, but this is something big -; the market just pivoted. 

Rather than try to predict the exact path -; and force -; of this new development in higher ed, we have a few questions that we all might consider as this unfolds:

1.     Will licensing of MOOCs created by highly-respected schools “;crowd out” faculty from the licensee schools?

2.     How might licensee schools feel about their new role as “;facilitators”?

3.     Will licensing MOOCs increase access?  Might organizations licensing the content decide to focus on fee-paying schools and create two tiers of content -; paid and free?

4.     If all schools have access to all of the same MOOCs, how will schools differentiate themselves in the marketplace to attract students?

5.     If different universities license the same course materials, but have different grading standards, how will we compare outcomes across universities?

6.     Might the difference between schools come from the quality of facilitation/support offered by licensee school faculty, rather than the MOOC faculty, since that will become widely available, and perhaps commoditized?

7.     If more schools use the license model, could we eventually end up with a handful of “;top” schools producing the content and a small number of large schools offering the degrees? 

8.     Will Coursera-type companies become the publishers in the new higher education market?

9.     Who decides what content/teachers are “;best”?  Will it become true that courses from Coursera partners will be viewed as “;superior” to courses from other schools because they are frequently licensed?

10.   Will license deals like this drive a wedge into the higher education market, essentially enhancing the star power of the best-known universities and leaving the schools with less-developed brands weaker?

So, higher education meteorologists, what does your weather satellite read? 

Dayna Catropa
Margaret Andrews

Inside Higher Ed | Blog U

10
Jul

Taking into consideration options

Written by Blog Editor. Posted in Academic News

Inside Higher Ed | Blog U

Blog: 
Getting to Green

Recently, I was talking to a friend of the family.  A middle-aged woman with a PhD, she's fluent in three languages and has spent a reasonable portion of her life in Europe.

One question that came up was why, in certain countries, people might be disallowed from spending their own money to buy health care that the relevant national health care system might deem to be unnecessary or of low priority.

The basic premise underlying that question, of course, is that people who have sufficient money should be able to spend it on anything they choose.  It's a pretty common premise, particularly in this country.  But it's not completely true.

When some function is seen as critical to the functioning of society, the application of money to advantage one individual over another is no longer seen as consumer choice, it's seen as corruption.  People shouldn't be able to spend money to get better treatment from the justice system.  They shouldn't be able to spend money (at least, not directly) to influence people when they're in the voting booth.  And they shouldn't be able to buy legislation (again, at least not directly). 

Physical security and equal treatment before the law is something a just society provides.  Universal education is something a just (and wise, and capable) society provides.  And, for the citizens of most developed countries, health care is something their society (just) provides.  Some of those countries have decided that allowing private money (and private providers) to enter the health care market is as corrupting as allowing bribery of police or judges or legislators.  As Hannah Arendt said, "Society is the form in which the fact of mutual dependence for the sake of life and nothing else assumes public significance."  Health care would seem to qualify.

My concern is not that this woman (a US citizen) doesn't have universally-available health insurance.  (Her husband is a federal retiree; health insurance isn't a problem for them.)  Nor do I worry that, in spite of having traveled and lived extensively in countries with universal health care she still doesn't understand how it works or how it affects social dynamics.  My concern is that she seems typical of so many Americans who appear unable to imagine any situation other than the one in which they currently find themselves.  No health care finance system other than the one we have (except, perhaps, the one we had before the Affordable Care Act was passed).  No education system other than the one we have.  No legislative system other than the one we have.  No military other than the one we have.  No economic system other than the one we have.

Have we created a generation or three with no real sense of possibility?  And if we (society) have, how much of the damage has been done by those of us in education?

 

Inside Higher Ed | Blog U

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